playframework

How To Setup CI Build Pipeline With Travis CI, Heroku and sbt

This post covers all steps that are required to setup a Continuous Integration (CI) build pipeline using Travis CI as a main driver for deploying our Play application written in Scala to Heroku cloud. Expected end result: After each commit to the master branch of my Github project, I’d like to run full test suite. Following that, each successful build, should trigger a deployment to Heroku. If the tests fail, application should not be deployed.

JSON in Play Framework - Advanced Libraries

This is a followup post to my previous one covering JSON in Play framework. I’d like to show how the manual work I did before in trying to make JSON mapping compatible with external API can be done by using 2 small but useful libraries: [play-json-naming](https://github.com/tototoshi/play-json-naming) [play-json-extensions](https://github.com/xdotai/play-json-extensions) play-json-naming This is a very simple library that can be used to convert from camelCase formatting (the default one that we use in Scala) to snake_case formatting that is common in various different languages (for example PHP or Ruby).

JSON in Play Framework - Techniques For Making Compatible Mappings

I’ll show 2 slightly advanced techniques for working with JSON in Play Framework (play-json) that are useful especially when you need to control the mappings yourself. For example when you have to make sure that your API is compatible with existing applications. The examples are based on my project Game Arena (which is in very early stages of development) One suggestion, before we start, take a look at Play Framework JSON documentation which is truly quite comprehensive and provides a very good introduction to JSON usage in Play.